New tree planting in Beckenham Place Park
Menu

New tree planting in Beckenham Place Park

​Tens of thousands of new trees will be planted as part of the plans to transform the park and most of these will be planted on the edge of the ancient woodland. On this page, you can find the latest information about the tree planting programme.

Tree planting in spring 2017

Funding from the Greater London Authority (GLA) has enabled us to go ahead with planting new areas of woodland this year.

  • So far 12,000 new whips (small woodland trees) have been planted, creating five acres of new woodland!
  • All species planted are native and include oak, sweet chestnut, field maple, rowan, small-leaved lime, hazel and hawthorn.
  • Woodlands are home to more wildlife than any other habitat in Britain. Large numbers of new trees also help to combat air pollution in London, which is why the GLA were keen to fund this planting.

Thanks so much to all the volunteers who turned up to plant trees too. We planted 1,500 trees during three very successful tree planting mornings! What a team!

Why have the new trees been planted in straight lines?

  • Most of the new trees in the park have been planted in straight lines. Although at this stage this does not look so natural, planting this way makes the future management of a woodland much more efficient and gives all the trees the best possible chance of survival.
  • Planted trees need aftercare to establish successfully. One important job is controlling plants around them to reduce competition. Gaps of a regular size between trees make mowing around them easier. Then, when it’s time to thin out some of the trees to allow the strongest to thrive and reach maturity, the gaps allow for larger machinery space to get into the woodland.
  • Equal spacing also means every tree has equal access to light, nutrients and water. This is vital in balancing competition between trees, achieving good survival and success across the plantation.

This design may look unnatural to start with, but as the trees develop and some are removed to allow others to thrive, the lines will become less obvious.